I spy… Fishing for blame

In New Scientist, 3 December 2016 “Invasive species[…] have been spotted in the deep seas of the eastern Mediterranean. The unexpected visitors were seen by remotely operated vehicle descending to depths of 1 kilometre in waters off Lebanon.” How interestingly are marine life framed! Who is the real invasive specie in this story? How many… Continue reading I spy… Fishing for blame

Identity of food: Part 2

You are what you eat, is the famous saying and I can say it in four languages. But you are also what you buy. The food we buy and the way food ‘talks’ to us has become a facet of our identity, a way for us to perform a certain identity. Dominant discourses about food… Continue reading Identity of food: Part 2

I spy…The fibres of slavery

In Selvedge, Issue 74, Bias What do these photos have in common? The founder of Selvedge, Polly Leonard, does not see sentient beings, but rather “performance fibres”: Alpaca, Vicuna, Cashmere, and Goose Down. She goes on to classify: “[Alpaca, Vicuna, Cashmere, and Goose Down] are associated with luxury and indulgence. I would, however, argue that they… Continue reading I spy…The fibres of slavery

I spy… RATinitis pigmentosa

In BBC Focus, issue 302 Christmas 2016 Boy do BBC Focus know how to bury the lead. The story beings with a positive frame: “In a breakthrough that’s been described by researchers as the Holy Grail of genetics”, we can see an almost religious exaltation. The reader gets excited to learn more, but we should be cautious.… Continue reading I spy… RATinitis pigmentosa

I spy…Parenthoof, woof, and meow

In The Economist, December 3rd-9th, 2016 We are witnessing a vast growing social change: animal rights and animals’ social agency is acquiring power and standing in an accelerated speed.  This week The Economist’s report on Airbnb’s pet accommodation solutions reveals this change manifesting through language, specifically, in a lexical choice. More and more Americans see their pets… Continue reading I spy…Parenthoof, woof, and meow