I spy…Holiday Cheer(s)

In New Scientist, 3 December 2016 and Metro, 6 December 2016 New Scientist boasts that, “after years of public health messaging and a tightening of the advice on safe limits, the UK public finally seems to be reading the warning signs”.  Additionally, it is claimed that alcohol consumption is decreasing especially among young people, which is… Continue reading I spy…Holiday Cheer(s)

I spy… Fishing for blame

In New Scientist, 3 December 2016 “Invasive species[…] have been spotted in the deep seas of the eastern Mediterranean. The unexpected visitors were seen by remotely operated vehicle descending to depths of 1 kilometre in waters off Lebanon.” How interestingly are marine life framed! Who is the real invasive specie in this story? How many… Continue reading I spy… Fishing for blame

I spy… H5N8 x2 = ?

In New Scientist, 26 Nov. 2016 In Hebrew, there is a fitting colloquial expression: para para (in direct translation: cow cow) meaning to take one step at a time. (The origin of this phrase is unclear). As the entire article is problematic, it will be interesting to take each clause para para: ” It’s here, just in… Continue reading I spy… H5N8 x2 = ?

I spy…Poopy food?

From New Scientist 19th November 2016: California biotech company Calysta has announced the first ever large-scale factory that uses microbes to turn natural gas – methane- into high-protein animal feed. Here’s who’s behind this: The factory, which will be built in the US in collaboration with food giant Cargill… Twisting the truth in 3, 2,… Continue reading I spy…Poopy food?

I spy… ‘Tis the season to be..hunting?

In New Scientist, 26 Nov. 2016 Joshua Sokol reports on the latest efforts to find planets that can support life, and that are similar to Earth’s life-sustaining conditions. There are quite a few intriguing linguistic observations to be made. We will examine both the similarities and differences in the print and online versions of this article.… Continue reading I spy… ‘Tis the season to be..hunting?

I Spy…”Implants let paralysed monkeys move.”

Yay for science, right? Wrong! Then you read on: The spinal cord was severed on one side above the implant, and a second implant put into the part of the brain that controls the affected leg. This implant detected when the monkey wanted to move and sent signals to the device in the spine. Within six… Continue reading I Spy…”Implants let paralysed monkeys move.”